renderraves

FCNY18 & The Campus Visit: Upright Citizens Brigade

Render followers know we're fans of the Fast Company Innovation Festival. This past October, Render's Brittney Joyce and Dani Napier spent a week in NYC traversing the city to pick up lessons from the world's most innovative brands.

A little humor can go a long way in diffusing a difficult situation. Improv is an untapped training tool to help tour guides learn to think fast on their feet and tackle inappropriate questions with a bit of lightheartedness.

When we saw that the Upright Citizens Brigade was hosting an improv class as part of FCNY18, we took a deep breath and signed up. Oof. This is very far outside of our comfort zone. Here’s what we did/learned:

  1. We did an improv exercise that started with “No, but…” in which your partner gives you a scenario (ours was we were hosting a Super Bowl party in which we debated on how to host the party and whether we should host it at all). This played out like:

    • “We could have everyone bring their own dish like a potluck!”

    • “No because we could end up with 20 bags of chips and nothing else, but we could order pizza instead.”

    • “No because not everyone likes pizza, but we could order tacos…”

  2. The next level of this exercise was “Yes, but…” Same scenario:

    • “We could have everyone bring their own dish like a potluck!”

    • “Yes, but we’d have to create and manage a sign-up list.”

    • “Yes, but we’d have to create categories for food and only put a few slots for each item.”

  3. Next level was “Yes, and…” Same scenario:

    • “We could have everyone bring their own dish like a potluck!”

    • “Yes, and we’ll create a sign-up list with slots for each dish or item!”

    • “Yes, and we’ll also order a pizza or other big dish just as a backup!”

See how things tend to flow much easier in the “Yes, and"…” scenario? When you use “but…,” it backs you and the other person into a defensive tons and stance. It invites someone to argue with you.

When parents ask a difficult question of a tour guide, we’d invite them to try “Yes, and…” instead of “No, but…” or “Yes, but…” For example, let’s take the most frequently asked question we hear:

“Is campus safe?”

“No, but…”: “Our campus is patrolled by three security forces: local police, blah blah, script, script…”

  • This is the “I don’t really know how to answer this question, BUT I do know stats and script! This response doesn’t connect nor does it answer the question. It invites argument which is why we usually hear this response followed with “Ok, but do YOU feel safe?”

“Yes, but…”: “Our campus is patrolled by three security forces blah blah blah, but I’ve never had to use any of those services..”

  • Again, translating this to: “I think campus is safe based on my experience, but I know my experience isn’t every student’s experience.”

“Yes, and…”: “I know that’s a big concern for parents these days. From my perspective, here’s what safety is like on campus, and I can introduce you to other guides so you can get different perspectives…”

  • Translation: “I know you’re concerned, I can only offer my point of view, and you’ll want to get multiple perspectives.”

TL;DR: Improv isn’t about teaching tour guides to be comedians; it can be a really useful tool in tackling difficult questions.

More from Fast Company & UCB: Leadership Lessons from Improv & Customer Service & Improv

More on “Yes, and…”: Second City’s Guide to Creativity and Collaboration

FCNY18 & The Campus Visit: DryBar

Alli Webb and Brittney Joyce: FCNY16

Alli Webb and Brittney Joyce: FCNY16

Render followers know we're fans of the Fast Company Innovation Festival. This past October, Render's Brittney Joyce and Dani Napier spent a week in NYC traversing the city to pick up lessons from the world's most innovative brands.

We often use DryBar as an example of the evolution of The Experience Economy: getting people to pay for something they didn’t know they needed AND being able to charge a premium price for that product/service.

What has Co-Founder Alli Webb learned among the way? Here are a couple lessons we thought were useful for you & the campus visit:

Brittney Joyce: Mid-blowout with hair that was 90% dry shampoo.

Brittney Joyce: Mid-blowout with hair that was 90% dry shampoo.

  1. There are a lot of copycat studios that have cropped up over the years offering blowouts. Alli said she used to be obsessed about what those studios were doing and how much they emulated the experience staged at DryBar. After a while, she stopped caring. She realized that although they offer a similar service, they’ll never be able to fully understand the thought and intentionality within the DryBar experience (ie: how they hang mirrors on the walls directly behind chairs for a customer’s turnaround reveal).

  2. The people of DryBar are everything to their experience, and hiring the right person is critical. How does Alli ensure the people they hire are the right people? She does a “cultural interview” where managers just hang out with candidates for a while and talk. If the candidate seems friendly and cool, then they get to blowout someone’s hair.

What does this mean for the visit?

  1. Stop being obsessed with the school down the road or your major competitor. We often share best practices with our clients, but no one approach to the campus visit is right for all institutions. You have to be true to your culture and design a visit that authentically reveals your campus DNA.

  2. Usually campus visit coordinators or staff members hire students, and we often find that staff members hire students who share their own personality traits (aka, we hire people just like us). Involve as many people in the hiring process to ensure you’re getting the right person for the job, and think about ways to include more rounds in a selection process other than an interview.

TL;DR: Just be you and think psychographics (not demographics) when hiring or selecting tour guides.

DryBar Co-Founder Alli Webb dishing all things authenticity.

DryBar Co-Founder Alli Webb dishing all things authenticity.


Render's Experiences - Volume 2

February was a short, yet jampacked month for the Render team. Catch up on what we've been reading, watching, experiencing, and pondering with our latest edition of Render Raves.

In this month's Render's Experiences, Jeff Kallay (Principal) and Brittney Joyce (Senior Consultant) pontificate on the admitted student visit, Marriott's newest hotel brands, the Salvador Dali Museum in St. Petersburg, Florida, and more.

Already listened to Render's Experiences and want to see the photos and articles we mentioned? You're in luck.

The Dreams of Dali VR experience at the Salvador Dali Museum in Saint Petersburg, Florida. 

The Dreams of Dali VR experience at the Salvador Dali Museum in Saint Petersburg, Florida. 

To technology or not to technology? That is the question.

To technology or not to technology? That is the question.

Jeff may not have enjoyed his AC Hotel experience, but come on... they have make-your-own-lavender-satchels in the lobby. What's not to love?

Jeff may not have enjoyed his AC Hotel experience, but come on... they have make-your-own-lavender-satchels in the lobby. What's not to love?

Every hotel should come with inspiration wall quotes that encourage shopping. 

Every hotel should come with inspiration wall quotes that encourage shopping. 

PS: Did you miss last month's Render Raves and Render's Experiences? Don't miss another one by subscribing to RENDER(ings)!